Point Mugu Airshow – Part 3 – Static Civilian Aircraft

Last Wednesday I shared pictures of our CAF SoCal aircraft flying at August’s Point Mugu airshow. Friday I shared static aircraft from other CAF units. Today, static aircraft from other civilian owners.

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Shiny! I’ve seen this Beech C-45 Expediter at many airshows. It’s stunning.

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The C-45 will carry two pilots and five passengers over 1,500 miles at a cruise speed of 207 mph, with a max speed of 234 mph and a max altitude of 23,300 feet. This would be a fantastic plane to own as a personal aircraft!

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More shiny! This is, of course, a P-51 fighter, in a different configuration and paint scheme from ours.

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Aside from the paint (or lack thereof), the biggest difference between this P-51 and the one we fly is that this one has not been converted to fly with a passenger.

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This is another Beech C-45, an “H” model. Different paint scheme, but more similarities than differences.

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Look at the lights on the nose, the landing gear, the vents in the leading edge of the wing between the engines and the fuselage — all the same as the silver plane. Some small differences in the engines, but planes can have different engines on the same body.

It’s still a great looking plane.

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This aircraft started life as an Army B-24 bomber, then ended up as a Navy PB4Y-2 Privateer. This is a standard for nomenclature for plane types used in both the Army and Navy during World War II. For example, the Army B-25 bomber became the Navy PBJ – the PBJ we’re restoring at the CAF SoCal is a Marine aircraft, further upgraded with machine guns so that it could be used as an attack bomber instead of just as a bomber.

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After World War II this aircraft went to the Coast Guard, then used in private service as an aerial tanker and fire bomber.

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Finally, another SNJ trainer. As with the Army B-25 and Navy PBY, for trainers the Army had Texans, the Navy has SNJs, and the British had Harvards. Texan = SNJ = Harvard.

I don’t know who owns this one (I forgot to get a picture showing the plane’s “N-number” or registration number) but it might be part of the Condor Squadron that flies out of Van Nuys Airport.

 

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